• Goodbye jelly belly!
    Losing weight using Tony Robbins’ 5 steps to change.

    This is my first woodcut using the two blocks that I carved and showed in the previous post. I had a lot of fun making this but I ran into a lot of problems. It was a great learning curve. Hopefully the next one will be more straight forward.

    Idon’t fit my favourite dresses.
    My children slap my wobbly tummy and giggle.
    I yearn for the strength and lightness I felt when I was fitter (when walking felt like restraint because every inch of me wanted to break into a run; and when running felt easy – not heavy and awkward.) More than anything, I don’t want to let go of my belief in myself that I am determined and self disciplined.
    It’s been eight years since I was at my ideal weight (pre-children), but this year I have a plan and no excuses: I am going to use a ‘Neuro Associative Conditioning’ technique taught by Anthony Robbins (often referred to as Tony) in Awaken the Giant Within.

    Below are excerpts from the five steps to change that Tony Robbins recommends. To understand them fully it is necessary to read his book. They are laid out and explained in detail in Chapter 6 and can be applied to any change, not weight loss specifically.

    1. Decide what you really want and what’s preventing you from having it now. The more specific you can be about what you want, the more clarity you will have, and the more power you will command to achieve what you want more rapidly.
    2. Get leverage: Associate massive pain to not changing now and massive pleasure to the experience of changing now. The only way we’re going to make a change now is if we create a sense of urgency that’s so intense that we’re compelled to follow through. To paraphrase the philosopher Nietzsche, he who has a strong enough why can bear almost any how. 20 percent of any change is knowing how; but 80 per cent is knowing why. If we gather a set of strong enough reasons to change, we can change in a minute something we’ve failed to change in years. Ask pain inducing questions: What will this cost me if I don’t change? What is it costing me mentally, emotionally, physically, financially, spiritually? Ask pleasure-associating questions: If I do change how will that make me feel about myself? What kind of momentum could I create if I change this in my life? What other things could I accomplish if I really made this change today? How will my family and friends feel? How much happier will I be?
    3. Interrupt the limiting pattern. In order for us to consistently feel a certain way, we develop characteristic patterns of thinking, focused on the same images and ideas, asking ourselves the same questions. The challenge is that most people want a new result, but continue to act in the same way. Think of some of the ways you can interrupt your own patterns. One of the key distinctions to interrupting a pattern is that you must do it in the moment the pattern is recurring.
    4. Create a new, empowering alternative. This fourth step is absolutely critical to establishing long term change. The failure by most people to find an alternative way of getting out of pain and into the feelings of pleasure is the major reason most people’s attempts at change are only temporary.
    5. Condition the new pattern until it is consistent. If you rehearse the new, empowering alternative again and again with tremendous emotional intensity, you’ll carve out a pathway, and with even more repetition and emotion, it will become a part of your habitual behavior. Your brain can’t tell the difference between something you vividly imagine and something you actually experience. Conditioning ensures that you automatically travel along the new route, that if you spot one of the “off ramps” you used to take all the time, now you just speed past them – in fact, they’ll actually become difficult to take. The next step is to set up a schedule to reinforce your new behavior. How can you reward yourself for succeeding? Don’t wait a year,. When you’ve gone a day, give yourself a reward!

    I will also be using advice and tools I have discovered via The Life Coach School. I have listed the specific podcast episodes below. I’ll be logging my progress over the entire year, aiming for a weight of 47 kilos by Christmas 2018 (preferably sooner). I weighed in two days ago at 55.5 kilos. Please get in touch if you’d like to join me in getting slim, strong, and healthy this year!
    Have a great week,

    Awaken the Giant Within by Anthony Robbins (also known as Tony Robbins)

    The Life Coach School Podcast Episode 197: Urges
    The Life Coach School Podcast Episode 129: Weight Loss and Overeating Tools Part 1
    The Life Coach School Podcast Episode 131: Weight Loss and Overeating Tools Part 2

  • A Little Advice…Or Not!
    Glennon Doyle Melton

    My latest experiment is with woodcutting. I’ve always loved woodcuts but never tried one myself. I designed this as a repeating pattern at a size suitable for homewares and interiors. The finished piece will appear in my next post.

    Irecently listened to the audio version of Carry On Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton. My favourite excerpt is this small piece about advice. It stands out to me because I know that I need to be more mindful in this area with my friends and family. I think Glennon makes a point beautifully and succinctly about what people really need:

    “I don’t believe in advice. Everybody has the answers right inside her since we are all made up of the same amount of God. So when a friend says, “I need some advice”, I switch it to, “I need some love”, and I try to offer that. Offering love usually looks like being quiet, listening hard, and letting my friend talk until she discovers that she already has the answers. Since I don’t offer advice Craig and I find it funny that people ask me for it every single day. Craig once asked what I make of that and I told him that I think friends ask me for advice because they know I won’t offer any. People need a safe place and some time to discover what they already know, so I just try to hold space and time for folks.”

    Glennon Doyle Melton

    I know I have a tendency to offer advice, but I think Glennon is absolutely right. In our hearts I think we do know the answer, and we just need the place and space to connect with it. What do you think? I welcome your feedback.
    Have a good weekend,
    Bren X

    Carry On Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton. At the time of writing this does not appear to be available through Audible. I listened to it via the Auckland Library on the Overdrive app.

    Carry On Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton.
    If you are interested in reading more of Glennon’s writing, she is famous for her blog Momastery and has recently released a memoir called Love Warrior.

    This will form the backdrop of my design, but this is not repeating. I will show the completed piece in my next post.